MYBODYISYOURBODYPROJECT “How many drops for chaos?” – Performance – c/o CACT/MACT, Bellinzona, Switzerland in collaboration with Davide Allieri

TRISECONDO

TRITERZO
"How many drops for chaos?"

205631_500310720019629_947308281_n

309749_500310540019647_1138914196_n

394964_500309406686427_2123579829_n

530830_500313620019339_852118958_n

558208_500304980020203_175865398_n

734477_4255909720312_1914758122_n
“Pieces of the person’s actual identity include a sense of continuity, a sense of uniqueness from others, and a sense of affiliation.”

newsletter

“How Many Drops For Chaos?” analyses concepts such as order and chaos, fluidity and dichotomy, all as a pivot points of Queer Theory. The origin of this action is the connection between body and nature in Jackson Pollock’s action painting, where the breaking of rules was represented in what seemed to be a chaotic vortex of his drip painting.
Amae re-interprets these drip paintings but rather than the drips being ejected from the painter onto the canvas in a shamanic dance, Amae anchors it to the body in a performance of self-tattooing, where the image of the drops is cut into the skin without ever being transferred out of the performer.
Amae’s dripping is an extended action of the re-writing of the derma, though no more controlled than Pollock’s painting it is more static. The drops metaphorically defy the force of gravity, they rain from the inside towards the epidermis, not unlike the effect of the orbit of the moon on the ocean tide. This is an action intended to subvert the concept of painting as a performance action in that it leaves its trace directly on the body. The body becomes a microcosm that is testimony to fluid and constant transformation.

Picture by Christoper Waugh

320985_10200332559744752_312549371_n

Advertisements

Amae – “Challenging the gravity force” – Mixed technique

“I have an idea that the only thing which makes it possible to regard this world we live in without disgust is the beauty which now and then men create out of the chaos. The pictures they paint, the music they compose, the books they write, and the lives they lead. Of all these the richest in beauty is the beautiful life. That is the perfect work of art.”
― W. Somerset Maugham, The Painted Veil

I continue to get further away from the usual painter’s tools such as easel, palette, brushes, etc.
Jackson Pollock

The modern artist… is working and expressing an inner world – in other words – expressing the energy, the motion, and other inner forces.
Jackson Pollock

I don’t work from drawings. I don’t make sketches and drawings and color sketches into a final painting.
Jackson Pollock

New needs need new techniques. And the modern artists have found new ways and new means of making their statements… the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or of any other past culture.
Jackson Pollock

Makeup implosion latest performances in Birmingham – “Binding Aby” – [STATE] of uncertainty

“How many lies can we layer, one on top of the other, in order to tell the truth? And is what we see in the end the actual truth or still a lie? When does a mask uncover rather than hide? When can bondage give you freedom rather than restraint? When can a tattoo be a cumulation of our fears rather than simply a decoration? Society shapes our identity and we often respond to that influence dramatically. How can we represent these psychological tensions of the body using the same language imposed by the mainstream?”



[STATE] of uncertainty

Makeup implosion latest performances in Birmingham – “Gay’s valve” – Invasion

Every time we apply makeup all we do is submit to an idea we have of ourselves – using products that invade our face, our skin, our body. The same happens when we surrender to the hypothetical master of beauty: the makeup artist, a serial killer of doubtful provenance. In reality, in those instants, what we are actually doing is simply fighting against our fear of who we are and of the passing of time; the horror of death. So we layer ourselves with makeup giving shape to a palpable lie that occludes the senses, forcing us to reflect on the stage we have reached along the path of the evolution of our identity. When the foundation closes our eyes, our sight opens to the inside of ourselves. It’s an implosion of fluid cream and colour, of glitter and lip gloss. A mask that reveals the tension, the thought.

INVASION exhibition